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ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 2: Fuelling the Greed

ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 2: Fuelling the Greed

ADA presents ‘The Seven Sporting Sins

Sin 2: Fuelling the Greed

Thanks to persuasive advertising and company endorsements from our sports men and women, many people, including children, teenagers, adults, parents and coaches believe that commercially prepared sports drinks are a must. But for the majority of us a well-balanced diet and being well-hydrated is all that is needed.

Manufacturers of these beverages are very deceptive about how they provide nutritional information; often giving the impression they are healthy when they are not. They spend millions of dollars promoting their ‘benefits’, often using sporting celebrities in their advertising or sponsoring sports teams to suggest an increase in performance for anyone who drinks their products.

Some examples of Healthy Snacks for before and after the game that will save your teeth and money are:

  • Glass of milk.
  • Cheese and apple slices.
  • Yoghurt and fresh fruit.
  • Fresh fruit and a handful of nuts.
  • Celery and peanut butter sticks.
  • Boiled egg on toast.
  • Tuna on crackers.
  • Plenty of water.

Extract from ADA's original article: "Fuelling the Greed"

 

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ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 1: A Lust for Taste

ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 1: A Lust for Taste

ADA presents ‘The Seven Sporting Sins

Sin 1: A Lust for Taste

Are you increasing your risk of decay?

Most people will have a sport drink because they taste good, and the idea of ‘electrolytes’ for fast hydration and a performance boost make these drinks even more appealing. Not only are sport drinks acidic and high in sugar but people tend to sip on them frequently during exercise rather than gulping all at once, increasing the time that teeth are exposed and vulnerable to dental damage. Sport drinks are designed for elite athletes and not the average weekend warrior- frequent use by anyone will cause your teeth to erode and increase your risk of tooth decay.

A quick glance at the label will let you know if the products you are consuming contain sugar or acid. Sugar can be masqueraded as a ‘healthy’ ingredient, such as honey, rice syrup, or even ‘organic dehydrated cane juice’, and whilst these may sound wholesome they are still sugar and will still cause decay if consumed frequently.

Here are some tips to help reduce your risk:

  • Avoid swishing sports drinks and intra-workout drinks around in your mouth.
  • Using a straw helps reduce damage from harmful beverages, as does drinking them cold
  • Discuss your training and nutrition regime with your dentist. A regular dental review will detect early damage and offer preventive advice.
  • If you’re not sure whether you need to be using specialised sports products when you exercise, make an appointment with an Accredited Sports Dietitian to find out more.

Extract from ADA's original article: "A Lust for Taste"

 

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Sugary Drinks

Sugary Drinks

Sugary drinks include any sweetened beverage:

  • Non-diet soft drinks
  • Energy drinks
  • Sports drinks
  • Fruit juices/drinks
  • Cordial
  • Sweetened tea
  • Rice drinks
  • Sugar cane and bean beverages

Sugary drinks contain not only high levels of sugar, but may also have high levels of acid. The combination of sugar and acid can contribute significantly to tooth decay and erosion of tooth structure. Marketers will have us believe that the diet option may be better for your teeth; however, these drinks are often just as acidic as the non-diet option. Sports drinks and energy drinks are not only sugary and acidic, but they also often contain caffeine, which has a drying effect in the mouth, and ultimately affects the acid buffering capacity of saliva. Furthermore, they are often consumed when salivary flow is at its lowest during physical activity.

Obviously, plain boring old water is best, however having these sugary drinks at meal times and with a straw is beneficial to reduce the adverse effects on your teeth.

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Dental Health Week

Dental Health Week

This week August 4-10 is Dental Health Week and the Australian Dental Association (ADA) wants all parents and children to ask each other : “Who is the Sugar Bandit in our family?”

Often Grandparents, parents, and friends will reward good behaviour, offer a special treat, comfort or even bribe children with sugary treats. It’s ok we’ve all done it! Unfortunately, children who consume high sugary foods and drinks on a regular basis are at greater risk of dental decay as well as obesity and diabetes.

Every time we eat, the bacteria (dental plaque) in our mouth and the acid from the food provide an acid attack which over time will develop cavities in our teeth. The greater and more frequent the exposure to these sugars, the greater the acid attack, the more rapid the progression of dental decay.

We are all aware of the obvious sugary treats such as confectionery and soft drinks, however, we must also be aware of the ‘hidden sugars’. These sugary treats can be often be marketed as ‘healthy’ options – such as dried fruit, museli bars, biscuits and fruit juice which still contain an abundance of sugars. Certainly it is normal to occasionally indulge in the odd sugary treat, and best to consume at meal times when salivary flow is high. However, we must be aware of the frequent ‘grazing’ on sugars to avoid dental decay.

So go on, dob in your families’ sugar bandit for the sake of your kids oral health.

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