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ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 6: Performance Envy

ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 6: Performance Envy

ADA presents ‘The Seven Sporting Sins

Sin 6: Performance Envy

Dehydration can be a common issue if you go to the gym, play a team sport, run, or do anything else that is active. Not only does dehydration stop you from performing at your peak it will reduce your salivary flow which means your teeth are less protected from acid attacks. Make sure you don’t suffer from performance envy, perform your best by staying well hydrated before, during and after sport. The ADA recommends tap water which contains fluoride that helps protect your teeth in the long term.

Tap water has the added benefit of being good for your teeth, unlike sports drinks that bathe your teeth in harmful sugar or acids. Water is free from a tap and cheaper than sports drinks from a bottle.

Tips to know if you’re dehydrated:

  • Is my mouth dry?
  • Do I have an acidic taste in my mouth?
  • Have I been sweating a lot?

Extract from ADA's original article: "Sin 6: Performance Envy"

 

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ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 5: Sports Gluttony

ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 5: Sports Gluttony

ADA presents ‘The Seven Sporting Sins

Sin 5: Sports Gluttony

Gluttony is another word you don’t normally associate with the super-fit and sporty! But certain habits such as snacking and grazing put our teeth at risk! Tooth decay is caused by how frequently we snack and how long you are exposed to food at any one time. Every time you eat, your teeth are exposed to the sugars in food, this is called an ‘acid attack’. The bacteria in your mouth (plaque) use these sugars to make acid and if teeth are exposed to this acid long enough holes develop -this is known as tooth decay.

It is important to beware of hidden sugars in so called ‘Health Foods’! These include culprits like muesli bars and sports bars where seemingly healthy ingredients are bound together with sugar! Frequency of snacking and sipping on foods and drinks that contain sugar like dried fruit, sports gels and energy bars will increase your risk of developing tooth decay.

Protect your teeth by:

  • Snacking on foods that have high nutritional value will help with performance and recovery before and after sport.
  • Snacking on foods that are light and low in sugar between meals.
  • Eating fresh produce. Packaged foods are generally higher in sugar than their fresh alternatives.
  • Reading the label – if sugar is listed in the top three ingredients it’s usually not a good sign.
  • Searching online is a great way to find healthy snack ideas

Extract from ADA's original article: "Sin 5: Sports Gluttony"

 

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ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 4: Supplementing Vanity

ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 4: Supplementing Vanity

ADA presents ‘The Seven Sporting Sins

Sin 4: Supplementing Vanity

Vanity can drive some people to use sport supplements like pre- and intra-work out drinks with little or no question of what is really in them, if they are deemed to achieve a lean and muscular physique.

The current wave of pre-workout and intra-workout drinks on the market make all types of claims but many of these products have not both been rigorously tested! Intra-workout supplements are often overlooked as a potential cause of tooth erosion, however the addition of acidic ingredients as well as the fact that people sip frequently on these over a training session makes them a potentially concerning product for your teeth. If you really are conscious of your health you need to be aware that these products contain acidic preservatives which will cause irreversible damage to your teeth if used frequently.

Don’t panic, not all gym supplements are bad for your teeth. The real danger is how frequently some of them are consumed, especially if they contain sugar or acids.

Your number one tip when buying sport supplements:

  • Products that contain ingredients like citric acid (food numbers 330 or 331) or ascorbic acid (food number 300) are acidic! Preservatives that end in the letters ‘ate’ like sorbate can also be assumed to be acidic!

Extract from ADA's original article: "Sin 4: Supplementing Vanity"

 

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ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 2: Fuelling the Greed

ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 2: Fuelling the Greed

ADA presents ‘The Seven Sporting Sins

Sin 2: Fuelling the Greed

Thanks to persuasive advertising and company endorsements from our sports men and women, many people, including children, teenagers, adults, parents and coaches believe that commercially prepared sports drinks are a must. But for the majority of us a well-balanced diet and being well-hydrated is all that is needed.

Manufacturers of these beverages are very deceptive about how they provide nutritional information; often giving the impression they are healthy when they are not. They spend millions of dollars promoting their ‘benefits’, often using sporting celebrities in their advertising or sponsoring sports teams to suggest an increase in performance for anyone who drinks their products.

Some examples of Healthy Snacks for before and after the game that will save your teeth and money are:

  • Glass of milk.
  • Cheese and apple slices.
  • Yoghurt and fresh fruit.
  • Fresh fruit and a handful of nuts.
  • Celery and peanut butter sticks.
  • Boiled egg on toast.
  • Tuna on crackers.
  • Plenty of water.

Extract from ADA's original article: "Fuelling the Greed"

 

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ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 1: A Lust for Taste

ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 1: A Lust for Taste

ADA presents ‘The Seven Sporting Sins

Sin 1: A Lust for Taste

Are you increasing your risk of decay?

Most people will have a sport drink because they taste good, and the idea of ‘electrolytes’ for fast hydration and a performance boost make these drinks even more appealing. Not only are sport drinks acidic and high in sugar but people tend to sip on them frequently during exercise rather than gulping all at once, increasing the time that teeth are exposed and vulnerable to dental damage. Sport drinks are designed for elite athletes and not the average weekend warrior- frequent use by anyone will cause your teeth to erode and increase your risk of tooth decay.

A quick glance at the label will let you know if the products you are consuming contain sugar or acid. Sugar can be masqueraded as a ‘healthy’ ingredient, such as honey, rice syrup, or even ‘organic dehydrated cane juice’, and whilst these may sound wholesome they are still sugar and will still cause decay if consumed frequently.

Here are some tips to help reduce your risk:

  • Avoid swishing sports drinks and intra-workout drinks around in your mouth.
  • Using a straw helps reduce damage from harmful beverages, as does drinking them cold
  • Discuss your training and nutrition regime with your dentist. A regular dental review will detect early damage and offer preventive advice.
  • If you’re not sure whether you need to be using specialised sports products when you exercise, make an appointment with an Accredited Sports Dietitian to find out more.

Extract from ADA's original article: "A Lust for Taste"

 

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