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A Child’s First Visit to the Dentist

A Child’s First Visit to the Dentist

A Child’s First Visit to the Dentist

If you have kids, you know that introducing them to new things can be fun, challenging, exciting, frustrating, and so much more all at the same time!

Parents who bring their children in to see us can’t believe how different seeing the dentist is now. Kids find it fun and look forward to their next appointment.

Today, in our society, there are a couple of benefits our children have, that we didn’t have when we were younger. People are becoming more aware of the need for good personal hygiene; parents are becoming more aware that they need to bring their kids to the dentist.

We have the tools now to prevent so many of the problems that many parents experienced as children. Most children with the opportunity to have preventive dentistry grow up to be cavity free with and with no anxiety issues about the dentist.

I made this simple special report to give you a couple of quick, helpful tips that you can use to help your child grow up with healthy teeth, and prevent as many dental problems as possible.

When is the earliest a parent should start bringing their child to the dentist?

Most dental books say when your child begins to have teeth, but in practice this doesn’t work out so well. Parents these days are looking in their children’s mouths and keeping a good eye on things. Unless there is a concern it seems to work best to have our first meeting when the child is about 2½ to 3. At this first meeting we treat it more as a social visit. They sit in the dental chair and have a ride up and down. We lean them back. If they let me look in their mouth and count their teeth, we will. If they let me polish their teeth we will.

Most kids enjoy the experience. We use our judgment as to how much or how little to do. Sometimes we have a parent in the chair with the child on their lap. Other times we have all the siblings in the chair at the same time. Sometimes it is more of a play with the chair. We do as much as we can always within the comfort zone of the child.

Problems arise when the child has not been in from a young age and they are not familiar with the surroundings. They then have pain and come in because they need work. The experience starts negatively and it is then hard to make it fun.

Our philosophy is to teach the children to enjoy being at the dentist, so if they need something done, they know us, they have been in the chair before and they feel comfortable. If the child feels comfortable and can trust us we can talk them through anything. For example when we give local anaesthetic we never tell the child it is needle, we tell them to close their eyes, take them on an imaginary journey and it is just a little mossie bite. Happy gas helps us a lot with children. Kids have sworn to their parents they didn’t have a needle it was just a bite!

Geelong Children's Dental Centre

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Which Toothbrush and Floss are for me?

Which Toothbrush and Floss are for me?

Which Toothbrush and Floss are for me?

Today a vast array of powered, and non-powered tooth brushing and flossing devices exist on the market shelves. Years ago, the selection of a manual brush and floss was simple. Soft bristles, small head and comfortable handle ticked all the boxes for a manual toothbrush. The choice of floss was largely between tape or waxed floss, with the selection largely down to personal preference.

Many people feel they can achieve a great result with a manual toothbrush, and that is fantastic. However for children, handicapped, elderly or the lazy (like me) many prefer an electric brush. Like most things in life, you get what you pay for, and my personal preference at the moment for the Phillips Diamond Sonic Care brush. Although not the cheapest electric brush on the market, it could be one of the most effective.

Recently, powered flossing devices have become available, claiming like the powered brushes, to provide a superior clean. The Phillips Sonic Care Air Floss is a fantastic adjunct to flossing. It has the advantage of being a very simple device to use, with the pulsations of air and water removing trapped food particles between your teeth. We tend to recommend this product for discerning people with a minimally restored mouth and a desire for optimal oral hygiene.

However, for our patients with periodontal disease or a heavily restored mouth with large restorations, crowns and dental implants, Geelong Smile Studio recommends the Waterpik. The Waterpik squirts a stream of water between teeth and under the gum to provide a comprehensive clean. When treating periodontal disease, the Waterpik can be used to precisely administer an antibacterial solution between teeth and below the gums.

To go in the draw to win a Phillips Sonic Care Air Floss please like and share our facebook page and either comment on the post or email us directly, in 25 words or less, why you you should be the lucky winner (Entries close 5pm - 26/11/2014).

To find out where you can purchase any of these devices at up to 20% off the normal retail price, email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Teeth Whitening

Teeth Whitening

Teeth Whitening

An amazing smile can have an enormously positive effect on self-esteem, self-confidence, beauty and success in life. In fact, the most simple smile makeover may be simply improving your oral hygiene by visiting your dental hygienist. The removal of surface stains such as coffee, red wine and nicotine can often be all that is needed to enhance your smile. However, only a dentist can whiten those stubborn and persistent deeper stains or darker shades of teeth professionally.

The most common and rapid technique to brighten your smile is with chairside whitening using the state of the art Kor whitening system. This system is second to none and is responsible for some truly remarkable enhancements in our patient's smile.

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Dental Tips For New Mums

Dental Tips For New Mums

Check and clean your baby’s teeth.

Healthy teeth should be all one colour. If you see spots or stains, it is best to have these assessed by your dentist.

As soon as teeth erupt in the mouth, it is advised to clean them at least twice a day after breakfast and after dinner. Initially use a soft cloth over your finger and then work up to a baby toothbrush.

At about 18 months to 2 years you should be able to clean the teeth with a toothbrush and you can add a small drop (pea sized amount) of children’s toothpaste.

Young children cannot get their teeth clean by themselves. Most kids need assistance with their tooth brushing until around 8 years of age.

Choose foods that do not have a lot of sugar in them.

Only milk and water in the bottle.

Do not sleep with your baby and allow them to feed continuously.

Do not dip a dummy in anything.

At around 12 months of age, teach your baby to drink out of a cup instead of the bottle.

The first dental examination can take place around 2 years of age.

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Dental Tourism

Dental Tourism

Just recently, I have been seeing an increase in people returning from Asian countries such as Thailand, Bali and Vietnam having had dental treatment performed whilst on holidays. The promise of 5 star resort accommodation, tropical holidays and cheap dental work seems to be an offer too good to refuse. Even health fund NIB will support your decision and guarantee your cosmetic treatment for 12 months. But is it really a bargain?

 

 

The questions that come to my mind are:

  • What training and experience has the treating clinician had?
  • What sterilizing standards does the clinic follow?
  • What materials and products are used?
  • What happens when something goes wrong?

Unfortunately, my experience has been that in recent times I have been seeing people returning with new veneers and new implants which were often in their hands, instead of in their mouth. One veneer fell off after 3 weeks! Or what about dental implants falling out in less than 12 months? Certainly, I have seen less than ideal dental outcomes performed by Australian dentists. However, in Australia we have stringent industry standards, freedom to choose our appropriately trained dentist and the convenience of local continuing care if the need arises.

My experience is that it is best not to be lured into the romance of the cheap holiday or even NIB’s 12 month pittance guarantee to achieve an apparent dental ‘bargain’. Just take the holiday instead!

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