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How to get the smile you love! - Free information evening!

How to get the smile you love! - Free information evening!

Dentist Dr. Jason Gray discusses...

How To Get The Smile You Love!

Free information evening!

Find out all about what can give you a beautiful smile…

  • Implants
  • Straightening
  • Whitening
  • Veneers
  • Bridges
  • Crowns

Thursday September 4th 2014
7.00pm - 8.00pm
7 McKillop Street, Geelong

Don't miss this FREE information evening.
Get all your questions answered by Dr. Jason!
Call 5221 6610 to reserve your place now.

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Diabetes - Keeping Your Teeth and Gums Healthy

Diabetes - Keeping Your Teeth and Gums Healthy

Diabetes - Keeping your teeth and gums healthy.

There are more bacteria in your mouth now, than there are people on earth! If those bacteria settle into your gums, then you end up with gum disease and unfortunately diabetics are more likely to get gum disease.

Recent studies reveal that the relationship between diabetes and gum disease may actually be a two way street. Not only are poorly controlled diabetics more likely to get gum disease, but those people with gum disease are also more likely to have difficulties controlling their blood sugar levels and this may contribute to the progression of diabetes.

As a diabetic you must control your blood sugar levels, and ensure you maintain optimal oral hygiene. It is essential to brush and floss twice daily as well as keeping your dentures clean if you wear them. It is recommended you quit smoking and to make sure to let your dentist know if you have diabetes or are diagnosed with it in the future.

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Sugary Drinks

Sugary Drinks

Sugary drinks include any sweetened beverage:

  • Non-diet soft drinks
  • Energy drinks
  • Sports drinks
  • Fruit juices/drinks
  • Cordial
  • Sweetened tea
  • Rice drinks
  • Sugar cane and bean beverages

Sugary drinks contain not only high levels of sugar, but may also have high levels of acid. The combination of sugar and acid can contribute significantly to tooth decay and erosion of tooth structure. Marketers will have us believe that the diet option may be better for your teeth; however, these drinks are often just as acidic as the non-diet option. Sports drinks and energy drinks are not only sugary and acidic, but they also often contain caffeine, which has a drying effect in the mouth, and ultimately affects the acid buffering capacity of saliva. Furthermore, they are often consumed when salivary flow is at its lowest during physical activity.

Obviously, plain boring old water is best, however having these sugary drinks at meal times and with a straw is beneficial to reduce the adverse effects on your teeth.

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Geelong Advertiser Dentistry Advertisement - Thursday, August 6, 1914

Geelong Advertiser Dentistry Advertisement - Thursday, August 6, 1914

From the August 6, 1914 edition of the Geelong Advertiser. Reprinted in today's edition.

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Dental Health Week

Dental Health Week

This week August 4-10 is Dental Health Week and the Australian Dental Association (ADA) wants all parents and children to ask each other : “Who is the Sugar Bandit in our family?”

Often Grandparents, parents, and friends will reward good behaviour, offer a special treat, comfort or even bribe children with sugary treats. It’s ok we’ve all done it! Unfortunately, children who consume high sugary foods and drinks on a regular basis are at greater risk of dental decay as well as obesity and diabetes.

Every time we eat, the bacteria (dental plaque) in our mouth and the acid from the food provide an acid attack which over time will develop cavities in our teeth. The greater and more frequent the exposure to these sugars, the greater the acid attack, the more rapid the progression of dental decay.

We are all aware of the obvious sugary treats such as confectionery and soft drinks, however, we must also be aware of the ‘hidden sugars’. These sugary treats can be often be marketed as ‘healthy’ options – such as dried fruit, museli bars, biscuits and fruit juice which still contain an abundance of sugars. Certainly it is normal to occasionally indulge in the odd sugary treat, and best to consume at meal times when salivary flow is high. However, we must be aware of the frequent ‘grazing’ on sugars to avoid dental decay.

So go on, dob in your families’ sugar bandit for the sake of your kids oral health.

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