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ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 2: Fuelling the Greed

ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 2: Fuelling the Greed

ADA presents ‘The Seven Sporting Sins

Sin 2: Fuelling the Greed

Thanks to persuasive advertising and company endorsements from our sports men and women, many people, including children, teenagers, adults, parents and coaches believe that commercially prepared sports drinks are a must. But for the majority of us a well-balanced diet and being well-hydrated is all that is needed.

Manufacturers of these beverages are very deceptive about how they provide nutritional information; often giving the impression they are healthy when they are not. They spend millions of dollars promoting their ‘benefits’, often using sporting celebrities in their advertising or sponsoring sports teams to suggest an increase in performance for anyone who drinks their products.

Some examples of Healthy Snacks for before and after the game that will save your teeth and money are:

  • Glass of milk.
  • Cheese and apple slices.
  • Yoghurt and fresh fruit.
  • Fresh fruit and a handful of nuts.
  • Celery and peanut butter sticks.
  • Boiled egg on toast.
  • Tuna on crackers.
  • Plenty of water.

Extract from ADA's original article: "Fuelling the Greed"

 

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ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 1: A Lust for Taste

ADA Dental Health Week 2015 - Sin 1: A Lust for Taste

ADA presents ‘The Seven Sporting Sins

Sin 1: A Lust for Taste

Are you increasing your risk of decay?

Most people will have a sport drink because they taste good, and the idea of ‘electrolytes’ for fast hydration and a performance boost make these drinks even more appealing. Not only are sport drinks acidic and high in sugar but people tend to sip on them frequently during exercise rather than gulping all at once, increasing the time that teeth are exposed and vulnerable to dental damage. Sport drinks are designed for elite athletes and not the average weekend warrior- frequent use by anyone will cause your teeth to erode and increase your risk of tooth decay.

A quick glance at the label will let you know if the products you are consuming contain sugar or acid. Sugar can be masqueraded as a ‘healthy’ ingredient, such as honey, rice syrup, or even ‘organic dehydrated cane juice’, and whilst these may sound wholesome they are still sugar and will still cause decay if consumed frequently.

Here are some tips to help reduce your risk:

  • Avoid swishing sports drinks and intra-workout drinks around in your mouth.
  • Using a straw helps reduce damage from harmful beverages, as does drinking them cold
  • Discuss your training and nutrition regime with your dentist. A regular dental review will detect early damage and offer preventive advice.
  • If you’re not sure whether you need to be using specialised sports products when you exercise, make an appointment with an Accredited Sports Dietitian to find out more.

Extract from ADA's original article: "A Lust for Taste"

 

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"Doc, My Teeth are all Sensitive."

"Doc, My Teeth are all Sensitive."

"Doc, My Teeth are all Sensitive."

You just need to look at the vast array of sensitive toothpastes available today in the supermarket aisle to realize that teeth sensitivity is a massive problem in the general population. But will this magic pill in these heavily marketed sensitive toothpastes be the tonic for all causes of tooth sensitivity?

To understand what causes tooth sensitivity, we need to know a little about tooth anatomy.

The brittle, outer protective layer of teeth called enamel is the hardest material in the body. Beneath the enamel is the flexible material called dentine, which is much like a stack of tubes piled on top of each other. Within the middle of the tubes of dentine is a fluid which communicates with the dental pulp. It is within the dental pulp where many blood vessels and millions of nerve fibre are housed. Heat, cold, touch, air and certain foods can cause movement of this fluid within the tubules of dentine resulting in stimulation of the nerve fibres and the resultant short, sharp pain.

But what does it mean when our teeth are sensitive?

If you are suffering from tooth sensitivity, it is most likely due to one or a combination of the following.

  1. Dental Decay
  2. Gum Disease and Gum Recession – when your gums have receded ‘i.e you are getting a little long in the tooth’ this can be due to gum disease, or recession caused by trauma to the gum due to over-zealous tooth brushing. It is the exposure of the dentine which is normally covered by enamel or the gum which causes the painful sensation.
  3. Microscopic fractures of teeth – Habits such as teeth clenching and grinding (bruxism) will eventually wear away the enamel layer. Each time you have decay and require a restoration, this ultimately weakens the tooth structure. The excessive load of bruxism coupled with a weakening of the tooth structure through dental decay can result in microscopic fractures within the tooth. It is this movement of the tooth structure under load which stimulates the nerve fibres within the pulp.
  4. Excessive consumption of acidic foods and drinks. Soft drinks, juices, wine, citrus fruits and some mouthwashes are all very acidic and the erosion of the enamel can also result in exposure of the dentine.
  5. Presence of plaque can cause tooth sensitivity
  6. Recent dental work – deep restorations close to the pulp, teeth whitening, crown placement and some gum treatments can cause teeth sensitivity.

Contrary to what the manufacturers will lead you to believe, their magic toothpastes will only be effective when there is exposed dentine – mostly due to gum disease or receding gums. These toothpastes work by blocking the dentin tubules and preventing the stimulation of the nerve fibres.

The other major causes of tooth sensitivity will not respond as positively to these toothpastes and further dental intervention will often be prescribed.

It is best to treat the presence of tooth sensitivity as a warning sign. Please call 5221 6610 and make an appointment with either Dr Gray or Dr Robinson to ensure that your sensitivity is not a sign of a more serious condition.

 

 

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Mother’s Day Reminder

Mother’s Day Reminder

Mother’s Day Reminder

Mother’s Day is often an enjoyable time of the year in rewarding those dear to us. Great family time, appreciation and of course in some cases, lots of chocolate. Watching my three boys indulge in ridiculous quantities of chocolate this past Easter, reminded me of a little known fact about chocolate, lollies and sugar in general.

Rightfully so, the anti-sugar movement has gained significant momentum and awareness, however, for the majority of us guilty of sneaking in the odd block of chocolate or two, the odd quick ‘pick-me-up’ handful of lollies or the quick squirt of sugar containing soft drink throughout the day, we need to be reminded of a fact with sugar and dental decay. “It is not the quantity of sugar that you consume that is a problem, but the frequency of the exposure to sugar.”

That’s correct, you can eat a bucket load of sugar, a bucket load of lollies, or a bucket load of soft drink within two minutes, then chew sugar-less gum and the effects on your teeth will be minimal. The sugar won’t do your waistline or diabetes any good, but your teeth will be ok. That’s my two-minute rule!

It's probably fair to say – Sugar Sucks!

 

 

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Mouth Guards

Mouth Guards

Mouth Guards

With the first hint of Autumnal chill in the air, our attention heads towards the traditional winter sports of football and more so netball for the girls. For a dentist that means the annual reminder for mouth guards.

In a previous blog post "Mouthguards a must!", we talked about that not all mouth guards were equal. Sure there are stock mouth guards and ‘boil-and-bite’ mouth guards widely available, but the best mouth guards are custom fitted by a dentist.

My experience with coaching local team sports is that the better the fit of the mouth guard, the more likely our athletes are to wear the mouth guard, and to also keep the mouth guard in their mouth during the match.

Often an overlooked aspect of trauma prevention amongst senior athletes is the presence of unerupted lower third molars. The presence of these wisdom teeth significantly weakens the lower jaw. On precise impact the lower jaw can easily fracture jaw. This was seen last year at AFL level at the Geelong Football Club (GFC). It has been my recommendation to the GFC and to senior local league athletes to strongly consider having all third molars extracted in the off-season.

And as a final tip, I can report that most dental injuries occur NOT in the actual match, but at training or practice matches. So don’t forget to wear your mouth guards at training.

 

 

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